WikiLeaks dump reveals Dow Chemical spies 
Today WikiLeaks began releasing a collection of emails obtained from the servers of Stratfor, an American private espionage firm with a client list that boasts such warm and fuzzy companies as Dow Chemical, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and the US Department of Homeland Security.
According to WikiLeaks, “the emails show Stratfor’s web of informers, pay-off structure, payment laundering techniques and psychological methods.” They also show that Dow Chemical had asked the firm to spy on Bhopal activists, who have been demanding proper compensation from Dow Chemical, the corporation responsible for the 1984 disaster, for nearly three decades.
Among the 167 messages released this morning is one to several Dow Chemical representatives, passing along the results of their ongoing monitoring of activist group The Yes Men. We would love to pretend that we’re flattered, or even surprised. But we’ve known for years that unethical corporations and the governments who protect them dedicate significant resources to monitor and suppress efforts to expose their damaging deeds. Hopefully, thanks to WikiLeaks, those for whom this is news will gain a little more perspective on how democracy is perverted by corporate power.

WikiLeaks dump reveals Dow Chemical spies 

Today WikiLeaks began releasing a collection of emails obtained from the servers of Stratfor, an American private espionage firm with a client list that boasts such warm and fuzzy companies as Dow Chemical, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and the US Department of Homeland Security.

According to WikiLeaks, “the emails show Stratfor’s web of informers, pay-off structure, payment laundering techniques and psychological methods.” They also show that Dow Chemical had asked the firm to spy on Bhopal activists, who have been demanding proper compensation from Dow Chemical, the corporation responsible for the 1984 disaster, for nearly three decades.

Among the 167 messages released this morning is one to several Dow Chemical representatives, passing along the results of their ongoing monitoring of activist group The Yes Men. We would love to pretend that we’re flattered, or even surprised. But we’ve known for years that unethical corporations and the governments who protect them dedicate significant resources to monitor and suppress efforts to expose their damaging deeds. Hopefully, thanks to WikiLeaks, those for whom this is news will gain a little more perspective on how democracy is perverted by corporate power.

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